Frequently Asked Questions

Following Q&A will teach you everything you wanted to know about batteries and how to optimize the usage.
The capacity of batteries is indicated as XXXX mAh (milliampere/hour). If you insert this battery into an appliance which consumes 100 milliampere current continuously, the operating time of the appliance will be around 20 hours mathematically.
If service time has reduced to half of its initial capacity or if charging time never seems to complete, it’s probably time to replace the battery.
Batteries are classified according to IEC classification standards: LR03 is equal to AAA, but in another standard.
In appliances without a charging function, yes. In appliances that do have a charging function, be sure to check whether the function was specifically designed for Ni-MH. If not, it’s best not to use Ni-MH batteries.
Don’t charge an alkaline or zinc-carbon battery, they are not designed to be charged.
Yes. All batteries have an expiration date, beyond which their performance decreases.
Make sure you measure the correct way: connect the poles to their corresponding measuring ends.
Lithium batteries can give off a strong energy surge after a long period of low discharge, making them ideal for fire alarms.
The memory effect is an occasional defect, which occurs in Ni-Cd and Ni-MH rechargeable batteries, where the maximum battery voltage decreases even though the original power of the battery remains the same.
Battery leakage is caused by forcefully discharging, short-circuiting, or the safety valve releasing excess gas from inside the cell.

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