Frequently Asked Questions

Following Q&A will teach you everything you wanted to know about batteries and how to optimize the usage.

There are several possibilities why a battery can feel hot or heat up: when the battery is short circuited (in a purse or in a drawer), when the battery got a severe shock (has fallen down) or when a battery is wrongly inserted in the battery box.
A battery is a chemical product which produces electricity by chemical reactions at its inside. These reactions and its inside materials do deteriorate over time.
The revised RoHS (Reduction of hazardous Substances) Directive 2011/65/EU...
There is the possibility that the measurement was executed wrongly. Please make sure that the plus pole and the minus pole are measured with the corresponding measuring ends of the voltmeter. If they are switched, there will be a negative voltage. If the poles of your voltmeter are correctly connected, there is a possibility that the battery suffered a phenomenon called “polarity reversal”. This is a rare phenomenon that can happen at the end of a discharge with 2 or more batteries in series.
Due to chemical reactions inside most batteries, the stored charge of the batteries is reduced little by little.
Typically for an alkaline battery is a gradually decreasing voltage when it discharges, which means that for some appliances, which need a high base voltage to operate, the appliance stops working even while the battery has still a bit of energy left.
There are different types of batteries, for instance Zinc Carbon and alkaline. If the previous battery was an alkaline, and the new ones are Zinc carbon, it is possible that the capacity and thus lifespan is less.
Our batteries are produced without adding Mercury during the production process.
The electrical capacity of different types or batches can differ. If such different batteries are used the difference in electrical capacity will grow during usage which could eventually cause one of the batteries to over discharge, leak and even explode.

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