Frequently Asked Questions

Following Q&A will teach you everything you wanted to know about batteries and how to optimize the usage.
The revised RoHS (Reduction of Hazardous Substances) Directive 2011/65/EU...
A battery is a chemical product which produces electricity by chemical reactions at its inside. These reactions and its inside materials do deteriorate over time. If you start using it within that period, the battery will operate normally and maintain the specified performance.
In case of skin contact there is a chance of chemical burns. Use clear tepid water for at least 15 minutes on exposed skin. Consult a physician in case of irritation, injury or pain. In case of contact with the eye, do not rub the eyes, but flush with clear tepid water for at least 30 minutes and consult a medical professional immediately.
As new energy flows into your battery, some heat is perfectly fine. If you notice the battery or charger becomes too hot to touch, cease the charging process immediately.
In appliances without a charging function, yes. In appliances that do have a charging function, be sure to check whether the function was specifically designed for Ni-MH. If not, it’s best not to use Ni-MH batteries.
Mixed use or leaving the battery in the appliance can cause battery leakage.
Avoid contact with the substance at all times. Place the batteries into a plastic bag before recycling them. Clean out the battery holder with a dry cotton swab. In case of contact, wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water.
Battery leakage is caused by forcefully discharging, short-circuiting, or the safety valve releasing excess gas from inside the cell.
Make sure you measure the correct way: connect the poles to their corresponding measuring ends.
Never use Ni-MH rechargeable batteries for waterproof appliances, appliances specifically designed for alkaline batteries, or in appliances with battery indicators.

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